Customized Home Building Advantages

The foremost benefit in building a customized home is that you get a house that meets your preferences perfectly, both in terms of purpose and value.Nowadays, most spec homes are built with “builder’s grade” materials to reduce the cost of the structure. However, these kinds of products have short life spans and the selections of house layouts and features are often restricted. Customized home building on the other hand gives you vast alternatives and lets you choose what to place and where. You would be able to decide the layout of your house, the floor size, colors of the walls, cabinet and flooring designs as well as artificial lighting and landscaping. Practically, the possibilities are endless as long as you have the right custom builders to consult and to help you construct a house that will match your preferences and necessities.Nevertheless, building a fully customized home is costly. Exceptional features and products are not sold “builder grade” price box in home improvement shops. This way you can assume to expend 2-3 times more per square foot structure costs of assembling a fully customized house.Building a semi customized home generally proposes several house layouts and floor plans to choose from. Also, you may choose from cabinets, flooring, appliances, lighting and spot lighting. Often, the flexibility depends on the budget allocation. For instance, a developer may offer a stipend of $ 2,000 budget for kitchen appliances and you will choose what will be installed in your kitchen. If you decide to buy devices that exceed the allowance, of course you have to pay the extra costs of it.Even if you’ve hired a great designer and builder, you have to work and decide on many things. Prepare to spend time in home improvement centers, bathroom and kitchen flooring stores, lighting stores, etc. You will have to make decisions on various features of your house and you would not be able to do this if you would buy a spec house.Nowadays, most spec homes are built with “builder’s grade” materials to reduce the cost of the structure. However, these kinds of products have short life spans and the selections of house layouts and features are often restricted. Customized home building on the other hand gives you vast alternatives and lets you choose what to place and where. You would be able to decide the layout of your house, the floor size, colors of the walls, cabinet and flooring designs as well as artificial lighting and landscaping. Practically, the possibilities are endless as long as you have the right custom builders to consult and to help you construct a house that will match your preferences and necessities.

Home Building Costs – What’s Important About the Cost Per Square Foot?

Everyone wants to know but not everyone understands. The cost to build a home or an addition to a home is often quoted as a “cost per square foot.” You really need to know how that’s figured to understand the quote and understand what your final costs will be.As a home building coach and building industry advisor, I have the chance to answer a lot of home building questions. This is a popular one.Question: What does “building costs per square foot” really tell me?Answer:We hear a lot about the “cost per square foot” when it comes to home building. If you’re looking for the square footage cost of your project, you’re likely really wanting to know how to figure the entire project’s cost.But, what does “cost per square foot” really tell you?First, you must know what parts of the home or construction project are counted in the stated square footage of the structure. There’s a lot of confusion surrounding this. In most cases, what is being referred to is the actual enclosed living area or heated area of the home.Attached spaces (like porches), extra storage areas, workshops, etc. are typically not counted in the square footage of a home.Now, on to figuring the “Cost Per Square Foot.”When you’re quoted $100 per square foot (psf)  to build your home, and you know the exact square footage, it becomes a simple matter of math.A two thousand square foot home, at $100 psf = $200,000 to build. This would be to build the entire home. And, since the foundation, garage, and attic are parts of the home … they are included in the $200,000.Just because they are not normally included in the square footage calculation, doesn’t mean that they won’t be built! The builder is, in essence, throwing them in for free … a better way to say it would be that they’re included in the quote of $100 psf. It’s just the way house projects are normally quoted.Ask For Details & Get it in WritingYou should never assume. Your area may be completely different. The builders you’re working with may have a different understanding and process. Always ask for clarification about what’s included and excluded. Don’t get caught short or confused. Get all the details before you decide on a builder, a materials package, or a project.Finally, get everything in writing. Then there won’t be any question.

A Brief History of Home Building

Although the area that makes up the UK was first inhabited by humans over 40,000 years ago, it wasn’t until 175BC that the Britons first started building large settlements. Before that time, the largest stone constructions seem to have been barrows and monuments. With the Roman invasion of England in 43AD, the building of more permanent housing flourished. In fact, the Romans made use of natural potash from volcanoes and some impressive know how to make concrete structures so strong that we can still find intact examples of them today.With the departure of the Romans in 430AD, much of the British population resorted to a more nomadic lifestyle once more, and towns were allowed to fall into ruin in favour of small wattle and daub homesteads. It was only in Medieval times that houses began to be made of sturdier stuff. Building regulations were introduced in the 13th century to encourage a better standard of dwelling in cities. A new ruling in 1212 outlawed thatch in London to try to reduce the risk of fire, and with that houses with tiled roofs became the norm.From then on the house that we know today began to take shape. With the Elizabethans chimneys brought about the idea of private spaces, rather than the traditional convention of a single large communal space around a hearth. Timber frames made it easier to construct complex structures with multiple floors. Brickmaking also improved, and gradually became widespread.By the late 1600s these changes, along with the widespread use of glass, had formed a template for how we think of homes today;: separate bedrooms, a kitchen with a stove, multiple stories, and large openings for light all became fashionable. But this was only for people with the money to afford such architectural features. It wasn’t until the early 1800s that glass replaced wood as the main window covering in London, and not until the great housing boom of the later Victorian age that a majority of people enjoyed an improvement in their standard of living. Around five million homes were built between the 1870s and 1914, bringing new innovations and comforts – such as bathrooms – to the masses.After the two world wars there was a need for more housing, and the innovation of the modern flat and tower block filled this demand. In the 1950s there was a housing boom, which saw almost half a million homes built each year. This boom lasted right beyond the 1970s, but hit a brick wall during the recession of the 1980s. Since then the numbers of homes built each year in Britain remains relatively low, with only around 140,000 built each year. It seems it will take a large shakeup in the way we think about housing to bring these levels back to normal.